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What is Scrum?

Scrum is an agile framework that enhances punctuality and quality of software delivery, through encouraging short, high-effort, collaborative, and extremely productive team “sprints”, instead of working on a longitudinal, motivation-deflating, and resource-consuming project. A Scrum Team consists of a Scrum Master, a Scrum Product Owner, and the Scrum Development team.

 

Scrum is a sub-sector of Agile that encourages projects to be completed efficiently to enhance time-to-market speeds, final product quality, and to promote transparency of project operations. Working in small 2-4 week sprints to incrementally work towards a finalised product, Scrum teams follow a set process involving sprint planning, daily Scrum meetings, sprint reviews, and retrospective meetings - ensuring that the project is working towards its pre-stated objective and vision.

 

More organisations now use Agile over traditional waterfall methods of project management and product delivery, and it is estimated that 84% of organisations using Agile methodology, utilise the Scrum framework - demonstrating its popularity and proliferation since its origination. The Scrum framework is very light and has a clear process strategy to follow - specialists are scheduled to do tasks that are within their expert realms, rather than a new individual trying to be a ‘master of all’ character and going through the lengthy resource-exhausting process of learning a skill from scratch.

 

Crucially, Scrum is a framework and is not a methodology - it gives guidance on how to develop products and manage projects efficiently, punctually, and without wasting resources or time, it does not explicitly state the step-by-step process of how a project should be organised. This fact has contributed to the success of the Scrum framework, as it is lightweight and implementation does not require stringent processes to be adhered to - justifying its finalised product, Scrum teams follow a set process involving sprint planning, daily Scrum meetings, sprint reviews, and retrospective meetings - ensuring that the project is working towards its pre-stated objective and vision.

 

More organisations now use Agile over traditional waterfall methods of project management and product delivery, and it is estimated that 84% of organisations using Agile methodology, utilise the Scrum framework - demonstrating its popularity and proliferation since its origination. The Scrum framework is very light and has a clear process strategy to follow - specialists are scheduled to do tasks that are within their expert realms, rather than a new individual trying to be a ‘master of all’ character and going through the lengthy resource-exhausting process of learning a skill from scratch.

 

Crucially, Scrum is a framework and is not a methodology - it gives guidance on how to develop products and manage projects efficiently, punctually, and without wasting resources or time, it does not explicitly state the step-by-step process of how a project should be organised. This fact has contributed to the success of the Scrum framework, as it is lightweight and implementation does not require stringent processes to be adhered to - justifying its versatility and tailorability to a number of different projects.

 

Central foci of the Scrum framework include transparency, inspection, and adaptations - all of which guide and determine the team’s operational flow. Within the inspection and adaptation phases, consideration is given for Scrum Events, including:

  • Sprint Planning

  • Daily Scrum - a 15 minute development team meeting to set an agenda and target for the day’s project objectives

  • Sprint Reviews - a feedback-based meeting to appraise the project advances made during the day and identify work in the Sprint backlog

  • Retrospective Sprints